SDG Champion Award

For an organisation that has done outstanding work around the advancement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

 

The Finalists!

Development Perspectives

Development Perspectives (DP) - www.developmentperspectives.ie  is a Development NGO based in Drogheda, Co. Louth which specialises in Development Education. Set up as a project in 2006 and an organisation in 2009, their mission is to contribute to lessening poverty, inequality and climate change through transformative education and active global citizenship.

Development Perspectives set up the SDG challenge as a project 17 months ago in an effort to raise public awareness of the goals as well as encouraging people across Ireland to take action to contribute to their achievement.

How have they demonstrated new partnerships or ways of working in order to deliver the SDGs?

For each goal, Development Perspectives works with different partner organisations across the country such to foster partnerships.

By setting challenges that relate to each goal, Development Perspectives gives the public an opportunity to become involved. The range of challenges created each month also ensure that it appeals to all interests. For each goal they also strive to include another Irish based organisation who work in the area of that goal.

Development Perspectives have brought the SDG challenge all parts of Ireland. It has worked with different types of people and groups. This includes nuns, a Permaculture group in Wicklow, the UN at a sustainable development conference in Canada.

How have they shown leadership on promoting and raising awareness of the vision of the SDGs?

The SDG challenge takes one goal per month and engages with people via social media, emails with info packs and 1 workshop per month in towns and cities throughout Ireland. Since April 2016, the SDG Challenge has been attempting to engage with people from all backgrounds within Ireland towards spreading awareness and encouraging action through experiential tasks such as the Poverty Box Challenge where people were challenged to feed themselves on €2 per day for a week.

Not only have Development Perspectives created an engaging and interactive method for the Irish public to become more involved with the SDGs, they have also created the SDG advocate programme, a course which trains and empowers individuals from each county to become ambassadors for the goals in their county.

How have they demonstrated the importance of universality by making the link between the local and the global; the domestic and international?

The SDG Challenge information packs give an overview of the situation globally, while the challenges outline actions that can be taken locally to benefit the overall picture. They clearly demonstrate the link between the local and global by looking at things from both perspectives.

Development Perspectives have an understanding that many problems which are perceived to occur somewhere else are alive and well in our own localities e.g. poverty, climate change, inequality. Development Perspectives work all around Ireland, but also, across the world to understand these connections.

How have they demonstrated new ways of working or approaches in order to maximise the interlinkages between the goals?

The SDG Challenge explores each goal during a run of the project. This ensure participants of the project have a clear understanding not only of each goal but also how they interlink with each other and how they impact on each other. 

Systems thinking is a core element of development education. It seeks to address how all of the goals cannot be viewed in isolation but as a series of interdependent issues. Development Perspectives uses systems thinking approaches with its participants to highlight these interdependencies. 

INTO Global Citizenship School

Global Citizenship School (G.C.S.) is voluntary group of teachers set up to encourage and support schools in learning about and acting upon global issues. They support primary schools in making a commitment to promote a more just, equitable and sustainable world using the existing primary school curriculum, structures & procedures. Becoming a Global Citizenship School is a commitment by the school to work for a better and fairer world for everyone.

How have they demonstrated new partnerships or ways of working in order to deliver the SDGs?

Global Citizenship School has been working to promoting the SDGs in primary schools throughout the island of Ireland. They are working to encouraging our young people and their teachers to become partners in making the SDGs part of daily life.

How have they shown leadership on promoting and raising awareness of the vision of the SDGs?

Promotion of the SDGs is the main focus of the INTO Global Citizenship School project. They use Facebook and INTO resources such as their website and conference to raise awareness of the Goals.

Global Citizenship School has developed a specific online summer course for teachers with INTO Learning and has organised national events to promote Global Goals, such as, the official launch in May 2016 attended by schools from both the Republic of Ireland & Northern Ireland, with keynote speaker President Michael D Higgins.

The Chairperson of Global Citizenship School, Maurice Hurley, undertook a “Cycle around Ireland” – during which he visited schools all over the island of Ireland, promoting the SDGs.

How have they demonstrated the importance of universality by making the link between the local and the global; the domestic and international?

Local school communities encompass the intergenerational aspects of our society. This is the focus for Global Citizenship School. They have worked to reach out to Coalition2030, Dochas, Comhlámh and Irish Aid as partners in this work

How have they demonstrated new ways of working or approaches in order to maximise the interlinkages between the goals?

The focus of Global Citizenship School is on curriculum based activities within the classroom.  It is geared towards pupils’ ages and abilities to introduce them to the SDGs and their importance over the coming 13 years. Pupils in primary school will be college grads by 2030!

National Youth Council of Ireland

The National Youth Council of Ireland is a national organisation which represents and supports community, voluntary and not for profit youth organisations in Ireland. Founded in 1967, we currently have 49 members across Ireland which represents the scope, scale and diversity of the youth sector who touch the lives of almost 400,000 young people in Ireland.

NYCI has been working on the SDGs with its members and partners at local, national, European and global levels. The work Valerie Duffy, in particular, in championing the SDGs is evident for all to see and hear. Valerie is currently the chair of Coalition 2030 and has been a real force of nature in promoting the goals across all areas of Youth Work.

How have they demonstrated new partnerships or ways of working in order to deliver the SDGs?

As founding members of Coalition 2030, NYCI have shown that the success of the SDGs will only be achieved through multi-sectoral efforts. Concern and NYCI have established an annual SDG Youth Summit which will be held annually from 2015 to 2030.

NYCI is also active at European level to ensure the SDGs are included in policy and practice. As a member of the European Youth Forum, NYCI is partnering with them to deliver SDGs events to over 7,000 young people in Strasbourg in June 2018.

How have they shown leadership on promoting and raising awareness of the vision of the SDGs?

As mentioned above with Coalition 2030, the Youth Summit in partnership with Concern and spearheading the SDG Town Youth initiative, they have shown remarkable levels of leadership.

The NYCI has led on One World Week - three educational resources created linked directly to the SDGs which are freely available online. They have provided mini grants to local youth organisations and young people supporting education and action at local levels around Ireland. NYCI have given free training to youth organisations and young people in their local communities to support deeper engagement.

The NYCI have held Two YOUth Summits on the SDGs involving 600 young people and another is planned in November 2017 which will engage 300 young people. NYCI is national coordinator for Global Education Week, running One World Week each year.

How have they demonstrated the importance of universality by making the link between the local and the global; the domestic and international?

By collaborating with national and international organisations, NYCI have displayed the links between the local and the global.

One World Week and their YOUth Summits on the SDGs have embraced development issues at a local, national and global level. The 2016 Youth Summit focused on the issue of Migration (SDG 10). We invited an Irish navy officer who served on the LE Roisin, rescuing migrants in the Mediterranean.

NYCI, together with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Irish Aid, manages the innovative UN Youth Delegate Programme for Ireland, now in its third year, which has given the opportunity to Irish young people to engage with the SDGs at an Intergovernmental level.

How have they demonstrated new ways of working or approaches in order to maximise the interlinkages between the goals?

The annual One World Week resources highlight the 'indivisibility' of the goals and that while certain goals and targets (eg. youth employment) could be the key message for NYCI, they continue to highlight the need to deliver on all the Goals.

NYCI is national coordinator for the Structured Dialogue process which feeds into European youth policy making and with a new Youth Strategy being created, NYCI is working to ensure the SDGs and young people are at the heart of the discussion and the outcomes.

NYCI’s values of a fair and just society where young people are valued; commitment to justice; interdependence of lives; sense of solidarity from acting together; strong commitment to freedom; and strong engagement with the ecological values of harmony and balance with nature drive all of NYCI’s work. NYCI believes in young people being active participants in their communities and works to empower them on SDG issues and action.

The Judges!

The external judge for the SDG Champion Award is Dr. Susan Murphy.

Susan Murphy is a lecturer in Global Development Practice with the School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin and coordinator for the joint Trinity-UCD Masters in Development Practice (MDP). Susan's research interests are in international political theory, issues in global justice, human rights and climate change, gender and social inclusion.